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  • Pillar breech rifles - The missing link?

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    You know round ball, you know patched round ball, you might know squashed round ball and of course you know the miniƩ(ball), but do you know the Tamisier bullet and the pillar breech rifle? You will by the end of this vid!

    A dive into a short 4-5 ye...

  • Madsen M50: From the Korean War to Star Trek

    During World War Two, Madsen (DISA) manufactured a licensed copy of the Finnish Suomi (see: https://youtu.be/hjs1uiAIpNQ). When the war ended, they wanted to replace this with a more modern, inexpensive design of their own. The result was the Model 1946 Madsen, a creative clamshell design of stam...

  • Denmark's m/75: A Lease-to-Own Rifle

    Denmark's adoption of the H&K G3 is a rather odd story. First off, the Danes adopted the m/66 H&K as its sniper/DMR rifle in 1966, while retaining the M1 Garand as its standard service rifle. Not until 1973 do they decide to update the M1s, and when they do a. major rifle test, the M16 wins. Howe...

  • Snipers Before Infantry: the Danish m/66 Sniper

    The Danes adopted the M1 Garand after World War Two, and continued using it as their standard service rifle all the way until 1975 - and alongside it they used the M1D as a sniper or DMR rifle. The Danish Home Guard decided to upgrade those M1D rifles in the 1960s, however, and looked to H&K for ...

  • The Gun Science Says Can't Work: Madsen LMG Mechanics

    The Madsen LMG is generally considered an extremely complex and confusing system - but is it really? Today we are taking one apart to see just how it actually works. Because in fact, it's a very unusual system, but not really any more complicated than any other easy self-loading action.

  • Beltfed Madsen LMG: When the Weird Gets Weirder

    First produced in 1902, the Madsen was one of the first practical light machine guns, and it remained in production for nearly 5 decades. The Madsen system is a rather unusual recoil-operated mechanism with a tilting bolt and a remarkably short receiver. The most unusual variation on the system w...

  • Live Fire: Madsen M50

    The Madsen M50 is one of the quintessential early Cold War submachine guns. Cheap, simple and utilitarian. Be sure to check out our accompanying for this video here - https://armourersbench.com/2020/07/12/madsen-m50-live-fire/ If you enjoy our work please consider supporting us via Patreon, TAB i...

  • The best named gun in the world? The Bang B1

    Experts at the time called it: 'Clumsy ill-balanced and altogether unpleasant to handle.' Charming.

  • Danish 1889 Krag-Jorgensen

    The Danes were the first military to adopt the Krag-Jorgensen rifle, with this infantry variant in 1889. It is chambered for the Danish 8x58R cartridge, which was also used in Remington Rolling Block rifles (although the Krag loading is more powerful than that of the Rolling Block). Unlike the No...

  • Madsen LAR: An AK for NATO!

    The Madsen LAR (light automatic rifle) was an attempt by the main Danish arms manufacturer to get into the military rifle market after World War Two (they also released a bolt action rifle around the same time, the Model 47). The first version of the LAR was chambered for 7.62x39mm and submitted ...

  • Danish 1865/97 Pinfire Conversion Revolver

    The Danish artillery was an early adopter of metallic-case handguns, taking on this pinfire 6-shot solid-frame revolver in 1865 - when most of the world was still using percussion firearms. The thousand guns made served well for many decades, until in 1897 they finally were recognized as obsolete...

  • Schouboe Model 1916: The Final Attempt

    The final iteration of the Danish Schouboe pistol is this, the model 1916. Produced in prototype quantities only, it took the features of the 1910 pattern (safety and external barrel pivot) and made a few more changes. The slide no longer telescopes over the barrel - possibly to add mass and red...

  • Otterup Model 69: From German Sword to Danish Plowshare

    The Schultz & Larsen company in Otterup, Denmark was a venture formed by a gunsmithing shop and a very successful target shooter to make precision rifles. In 1919, they are able to purchase a bunch of German arsenal tooling for pennies because of the Treaty of Versailles. They made a number of ri...

  • Denmark's Post-WW2 SMG: the Hovea m/49

    The Hovea m/49 was adopted by Denmark, but was originally designed by Huqvarna for Swedish military trials. The first 10 prototype were made in 1944 and competed against the Carl Gustav Stads design - which ultimately won and was adopted by Sweden as the m/45. Both designs were very similar; simp...

  • Danish M1941 Suomi SMG

    When the Tikkakoski company bought the rights to produce the kp31 "Suomi" submachine gun in the 1930s, they attempted to make a bunch of export sales, although none were very successful. By the late 30s more countries were interested, but by that time Finnish military needs took precedence. While...

  • Danish Madsen-Saetter GPMG at the Range

    The Madsen-Saetter is a general purpose machine gun that had the unfortunate luck to compete against the MG42/MG3 and FN MAG. It is a quite nice gun to shoot, but not quite up to the overall standard et by those other two guns, arguably the best of their type ever made in the West. This example i...

  • Pistols of Denmark's Artist-Turned-Inventor Bent Agner Nielsen

    Bent Agner Nielsen was a Danish tinkerer born in 1925, who studied art as a young man and worked as a painter. In the 1970s he became interested in firearms, beginning with engraving work. This soon evolved into an interest in mechanical design, and in 1978 he began work on the M80, an Olympic-st...

  • Bergmann-Bayard M1910/21 Mechanics

    Today we're looking at the mechanics of the Bergmann-Bayard M1910/21 self-loading pistol. This particular one is a very nice example of the Danish-made late variant of the design.

  • Madsen M1950 SMG - Disassembly and Shooting

    The M50 was one of a series of submachine guns developed and marketed by the Danish Madsen company after World War II. The first was the M46 (1946), followed by M50 and the M53. Each version was progressively a bit better than the last, but they never sold particularly well because of the easy an...

  • Madsen-Ljungman Semiauto Rifle

    Thanks to web site reader John D, we have a chance today to look at a very scarce Danish-made copy of the AG-42B Ljungman rifle. The Madsen company in Denmark made about 50 of these rifles for military trials, in several different calibers. This one, and a few others, were imported with a batch o...

  • Overview of Danish Schouboe .45 & .32 Caliber Pistols

    In 1903, Danish engineer Jens Schouboe began developing an automatic pistol for the Dansk Rekylriffel Syndikat in Copenhagen (later to become the Madsen company). He made the guns in both .32ACP and also in a proprietary Danish .45 caliber based (I believe) on the centerfire conversion of Denmark...

  • Schultz & Larsen RPLT-42: Danish Occupation Rifle

    When the Danish Coastal Police was formed under German occupation to patrol the Danish shores, they needed rifles. Rather than use valuable military arms, the government turned to the noted sporting and target rifle manufacturer Schultz & Larsen to make a military version of the Model 36 target r...

  • Danish m/49 Service Pistol by SIG

    When Denmark decided to replace its M1910/21 Bergmann service pistols, it did not have to look far for a very high-quality option. The Swiss military was just concluding several years of handgun trials that had culminated in the SIG P210. This was an extremely well-made weapon, arguably the highe...

  • Danish Gevaer m/50 - An American Gun Made in Italy

    Dozens of countries around the world received M1 Garand rifles from the United States in the decades after World War Two, and Denmark was one of those that not only got some rifle but went so far as to formally adopt the M1 as its post-war standard. The US and Denmark signed a mutual defense agre...